Fruit & Fruition

The following post is shared with permission. Tanya MacIntosh is one of the group leaders for this year’s Fluevog Aid Trip.

The first thing I learned on this trip is how to choose a Yucatan banana that’s perfectly ripe, a banana from Darcy’s garden.  At home, a banana is ready when it’s yellow not green, firm yet easy to peel. You know what I’m talking about – that perfect banana.  Here, it’s not enough that the banana is yellow. Here, it has to start splitting down the seam, ready to share its flavour with you. These little bananas are so good!  So sweet! Plus, knowing they’re from your friend’s garden makes them taste even better. Think of eating tomatoes from your grandmother’s garden – these tomatoes always taste better than what you’d buy at the supermarket.  It’s like this produce has more love in it or something.

Going into our fourth Fluevog Aid Trip, there are so many aspects that have changed, paired with so many projects and people that are known to those of us returning.  It’s been a real gift to have three years of experience in our back pocket that we pulled out and built on to develop this trip to make it even more of a Fluevog experience.  There has been an organic, natural evolution to this year’s planning, from tailoring the schedule to make sure our team gets the full flavour of the Yucatan to tailoring our service projects to best serve the people and communities we’re here to help.  This year, the trip is fresh but still familiar.

Eating another banana this morning, I wondered about what other weird and unexpected things we’d learn this week: weird and unexpected like the right way to eat a banana.  Who knew that was a thing, right? The best part is knowing that these weird and unexpected things will be shared, experienced together, and will be part of this tapestry that we’re weaving as a team as we do a little good.  And, it’s cool that we’ll be sharing it with you. We’re all in this together.

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